Methylation

Methylation is a vital biochemical process that involves transmission of a methyl group (a carbon atom bound to 3 hydrogen atoms, or CH3) from one molecule to another. This simple process affects a multitude of functions in the human body 

What does methylation do?

Supports healthy brain function and mental health by regulation neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, adrenalin)

Produces glutathione - the most powerful antioxidant in your body

Helps you breakdown excess histamine 

Produces phosphatidylcholine that supports healthy nerve-impulse transmission, healthy brain function and healthy cells

Helps your body produce and regulate hormones 

Assists your body in getting rid of toxins and heavy metals

Supports healthy liver function

Keeps the immune system functioning properly, by controlling T-cell production. Helps you effectively fight off viruses and infections. Regulates your immune response so that you don't develop autoimmune conditions 

Builds and repairs DNA

What happens when methylation doesn't work well?

Genetic variations or SNPs (Single-nucleotide Polymorphisms) can affect MTHFR and other genes responsible for optimal methylation cycle function. A number of symptoms and conditions are linked to impaired methylation function, such as: 

Anxiety

Depression

OCD

Phobias

Emotional inflexibility

Bipolar disorder

Dissociative disorders 

Hyperactivity 

Attention deficit disorder (ADD)

Suicidal tendencies

Shizophrenia 

Cardiovascular disease 

Elevated homocysteine levels

Headaches

Migraines

Autoimmune conditions

Liver issues

Chemical sensitivities 

Kidney stones

 

Alzheimers

 

Dementia 

 

Epilepsy 

Autism 

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Fibromyalgia  

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Digestive issues

Leaky gut

Pre-eclampsia

Neural tube defects 

PCOS

Infertility 

What affects the methylation cycle? 

Regardless of whether you have a genetic variation that affects your methylation cycle (it's is estimated that 40% of the world population have a MTHFR mutation), there's a plethora of factors that can influence it's function, such as stress, environmental toxins, digestive issues, poor diet (especially diets low in zinc, B12, B6 and folate), folic acid (a synthetic form of folate that is potentially toxic for people with MTHFR gene mutations, it also interferes with folate absorption), alcohol consumption, low stomach acid and a number of medications that affect B-vitamin absorption.